Byzantine Daniel

is Someone Else's Dream

801 notes

laclefdescoeurs:

Student Nihilist, 1883, Ilya Repin
“The Nihilist, that strange martyr who has no faith, who goes to the stake without enthusiasm, and dies for what he does not believe in, is a purely literary product. He was invented by Turgenev, and completed by Dostoevsky. Robespierre came out of the pages of Rousseau as surely as the People’s Palace rose out of the debris of a novel. Literature always anticipates life. It does not copy it, but moulds it to its purpose. The nineteenth century, as we know it, is largely an invention of Balzac. Our Luciens de Rubempré, our Rastignacs, and De Marsays made their first appearance on the stage of the Comédie Humaine. We are merely carrying out, with footnotes and unnecessary additions, the whim or fancy or creative vision of a great novelist.” Oscar Wilde in The Decay of Lying

laclefdescoeurs:

Student Nihilist, 1883, Ilya Repin

The Nihilist, that strange martyr who has no faith, who goes to the stake without enthusiasm, and dies for what he does not believe in, is a purely literary product. He was invented by Turgenev, and completed by Dostoevsky. Robespierre came out of the pages of Rousseau as surely as the People’s Palace rose out of the debris of a novel. Literature always anticipates life. It does not copy it, but moulds it to its purpose. The nineteenth century, as we know it, is largely an invention of Balzac. Our Luciens de Rubempré, our Rastignacs, and De Marsays made their first appearance on the stage of the Comédie Humaine. We are merely carrying out, with footnotes and unnecessary additions, the whim or fancy or creative vision of a great novelist.” Oscar Wilde in The Decay of Lying

(via velificatio)

8,866 notes

asheathes:

WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: BRAZIL

The Brazilian School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a smattering of low-rise cottages hidden in the coastal forests of Bahia near a mid-sized bay where Senhor Cardoso’s martial arts students like to practice a fusion of defensive magic and capoeira (often to an audience of wide-eyed first-years), and build soaring sand castles to pass the time. Wands were introduced by immigrants and have grown in popularity with the diversification of the student body; however, the use of focal objects and organic magic still remain prominent. Students dress in demure robes throughout the year, and break out their flashiest clothing for Carnival during which there is an unofficial competition for the most creative clothing enchantments (glitter-burst charms are common, as are colour-shifting spells although they do tend to backfire and turn clothes an ugly medley of brown and vomit-yellow if the fabric doesn’t take well to enchantments).

(via everthehero)